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Francophone Immigration
Health

The Francophone Immigration Health project is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

About the Francophone Immigration Health initiative

Building capacity to ensure a healthy start for francophone immigrants.

Building on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) Settlement Program logic model, the Société Santé en français (SSF), in collaboration with Canada’s 16 French Health Networks, has developed a series of initiatives that will:

  • Bring the health and settlement sectors closer together;
  • Study the health challenges faced by newcomers;
  • Update and improve tools designed for the settlement sector; and
  • Offer health-related training adapted to meet the needs of settlement practitioners.

Official launch (in French)

Objectives

  • Build the capacity of settlement practitioners to provide Francophone immigrants with support on health issues.
  • Build community capacity to meet the health needs of Francophone immigrants, including mental health.
  • Grow our knowledge of the challenges and the solutions that would improve the health status of Francophone immigrants.

The 4 Streams

A total of 37 projects are under way across the 12 Canadian provinces and territories where French is the minority official language. These projects are divided into four major streams.

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Stream 1

Creation or expansion of links and opportunities for collaboration between the settlement and health sectors.

Stream 2

Acquisition of knowledge on the needs Francophone immigrants and the challenges they experience.

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Stream 3

Production of tools to support settlement practitioners.

Stream 4

Training on the health sector for settlement practitioners.

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This project is aligned with the priorities identified in the FCFA’s Plan stratégique communautaire en immigration francophone 2018-2023 (community strategic plan for Francophone immigration 2018-2023) and helps strengthen community vitality.

The SSF believes that this project is an effective response to these priorities as the anticipated outcomes support the delivery of settlement services that address the health needs of Francophone immigrants.